Latest News

Save 30% on Tuesday November 7, 2017 at our Beavercreek Ohio Designer Eyewear Frame Show!

Our Woodman Office Has Moved! Our new location is 3085 Woodman Drive, Suite 100, Dayton, Ohio 45420. See our Locations page for a map and office hours.

Gift Certificates for Eye Exams are now available at VisionMakers and Beavercreek Vision Center

Attention Pet Lovers!

VisionMakers is now carrying
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Eye Care Information



How We See

Eye Structure Diagram
Image Courtesy: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health

Light first passes through the Cornea, transparent tissue that covers the eye.
Light then passes through the Pupil, the black dot in the eye surrounded by the Iris.
The iris gives our eyes color. It is a muscle that gets larger and smaller to let in different amounts of light.
Light then reaches the Lens which changes shape to focus the light on the Retina, the back part of the eye made up of tiny light sensitive structures called Rods and Cones.
Rods see black and white; cones only see color. Rods provide most peripheral or side vision.
Finally, the Optic Nerve sends the image to the brain where it is processed.

For further exploration of how we see, visit the Prevent Blindness America website. Just click here, which will open the link in a separate window or tab.



Common Eye Diseases

Here is a basic guide to the four most common eye diseases encountered today, just click on a link below.

Macular Degeneration
Diabetic Retinopathy
Glaucoma
Cataract
 
For information on other common eye problems, visit the Prevent Blindness America website here (the link will open in a separate window or tab)

Macular Degeneration

Normal Vision Image
Macular Degeneration Image
Images Courtesy: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease associated with aging that gradually destroys sharp, central vision. Central vision is needed for seeing objects clearly and for common daily tasks such as reading and driving.

AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. AMD causes no pain.

In some cases, AMD advances so slowly that people notice little change in their vision. In others, the disease progresses faster and may lead to a loss of vision in both eyes. AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 years of age and older.
 
More information on AMD can be found on the Prevent Blindness America website. Click here to open the link in a separate window or tab.


Diabetic Retinopathy

Normal Vision Image
Diabetic Retinopathy Image
Images Courtesy: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina.

In some people with diabetic retinopathy, blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In other people, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. The retina is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. A healthy retina is necessary for good vision.

If you have diabetic retinopathy, at first you may not notice changes to your vision. But over time, diabetic retinopathy can get worse and cause vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy usually affects both eyes.
 
More information on diabetic retinopathy can be found on the Prevent Blindness America website. Click here to open the link in a separate window or tab.


Glaucoma

Normal Vision Image
Glaucoma Image
Images Courtesy: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye's optic nerve and result in vision loss and blindness.

Glaucoma occurs when the normal fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises.

However, with early treatment, you can often protect your eyes against serious vision loss.
 
More information on glaucoma can be found on the Prevent Blindness America website. Click here to open the link in a separate window or tab.


Cataract

Normal Vision Image
Cataract Image
Images Courtesy: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health

A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. Most cataracts are related to aging. Cataracts are very common in older people. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery.

A cataract can occur in either or both eyes. It cannot spread from one eye to the other.
 
More information on cataracts can be found on the Prevent Blindness America website. Click here to open the link in a separate window or tab.